Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Cervus > Cervus elaphus

Cervus elaphus (wapiti or elk; elk; wapiti; Red Deer)

Synonyms:
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The red deer (Cervus elaphus) is one of the largest deer species. The red deer inhabits most of Europe, the Caucasus Mountains region, Asia Minor, Iran, parts of western Asia, and central Asia. It also inhabits the Atlas Mountains region between Morocco and Tunisia in northwestern Africa, being the only species of deer to inhabit Africa. Red deer have been introduced to other areas, including Australia, New Zealand, United States, Canada, Peru, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina. In many parts of the world, the meat (venison) from red deer is used as a food source.
View Wikipedia Record: Cervus elaphus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

View ISSG Record: Cervus elaphus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.04
EDGE Score: 1.8

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  440.927 lbs (200.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  22.267 lbs (10.10 kg)
Male Weight [3]  268.965 lbs (122.00 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  2 years 4 months
Male Maturity [1]  2 years
Gestation [1]  8 months 5 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  32 years
Snout to Vent Length [3]  7.019 feet (214 cm)
Speed [4]  34.001 MPH (15.2 m/s)
Weaning [1]  5 months 6 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

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Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Emblem of

Ireland
Utah

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

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Predators

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Audio

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Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Role of Various Woody Species in Spanish Mediterranean Forest and Scrubland as Food Resources for Spanish Ibex (Capra pyrenaica Schinz) and Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L.), T. Martínez, Agroforestry in Europe: Current Status and Future Prospects, pp. 233-253 (2009)
6Dangerous liaisons disperse the Mediterranean dwarf palm: fleshy-pulp defensive role against seed predators, José M. Fedriani and Miguel Delibes, Ecology, 92(2), 2011, pp. 304–315
7National Geographic Magazine - May 2016 - Yellowstone - The Carnivore Comeback
8Ecology of Commanster
9Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
10Foraging by lynx and its role in ungulate mortality: the local (Białowieża Forest) and the Palaearctic viewpoints, Włodzimierz JĘDRZEJEWSKI, Krzysztof SCHMIDT, Lech MIŁKOWSKI, Bogumiła JĘDRZEJEWSKA, Henryk OKARMA, Acta Theriologica 38 (4): 385-403
11Feeding Ecology of the Spanish Lynx in the Coto Doñana, Miguel Delibes, ACTA THERIOLOGICA Vol. 25, 24: 309-324, 1980
12Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
13Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
14Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
15International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0