Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Cervidae > Rangifer > Rangifer tarandus

Rangifer tarandus (caribou; reindeer)

Synonyms:
Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), also known as caribou in North America, is a species of deer with circumpolar distribution, native to Arctic, Subarctic, tundra, boreal and mountainous regions of northern Europe, Siberia, and North America. This includes both sedentary and migratory populations. While overall widespread and numerous, some of its subspecies are rare and at least one has already become extinct. For this reason, it is considered to be vulnerable by the IUCN.
View Wikipedia Record: Rangifer tarandus

Infraspecies

Endangered Species

Status: Vulnerable
View IUCN Record: Rangifer tarandus

Invasive Species

View ISSG Record: Rangifer tarandus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
5
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 11.66
EDGE Score: 2.54

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  223.219 lbs (101.25 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  14.33 lbs (6.50 kg)
Male Weight [4]  243.612 lbs (110.50 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 9 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 10 months
Gestation [1]  7 months 18 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  22 years
Migration [3]  Intracontinental
Snout to Vent Length [4]  7.249 feet (221 cm)
Speed [5]  32.01 MPH (14.31 m/s)
Weaning [1]  4 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Emblem of

Newfoundland & Labrador

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Parasite of 
Cephenemyia trompe (Bot fly)[7]

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
6Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Exploring the Denali Food Web, ParkWise, National Park Service
9Golden Eagles on the Swedish mountain tundra – diet and breeding success in relation to prey fluctuations, Jesper Nyström, Johan Ekenstedt, Anders Angerbjörn, Linda Thulin, Peter Hellström & Love Dalén, Ornis Fennica 83:145–152. 2006
10Cuon alpinus, James A. Cohen, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 100, pp. 1-3 (1978)
11Predator–prey relationships: arctic foxes and lemmings, Anders Angerbjorn, Magnus Tannerfeldt and Sam Erlinge, Journal of Animal Ecology, Volume 68, Issue 1, Pages 34-49
12Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
13Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0