Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Bovidae > Antidorcas > Antidorcas marsupialis

Antidorcas marsupialis (springbok)

Synonyms: Antilope marsupialis (homotypic)

Wikipedia Abstract

(This article is about the antelope. For the "Springboks", see South Africa national rugby union team. For other uses, see Springbok (disambiguation).) The springbok /ˈsprɪŋˌbɒk/ (Antidorcas marsupialis) is a medium-sized antelope found mainly in southern and southwestern Africa. The sole member of the genus Antidorcas, this bovid was first described by the German zoologist Eberhard August Wilhelm von Zimmermann in 1780. Three subspecies are identified. A slender, long-legged antelope, the springbok reaches 71 to 86 cm (28 to 34 in) at the shoulder and weighs between 27 and 42 kg (60 and 93 lb). Both sexes have a pair of black, 35-to-50-centimetre (14 to 20 in) long horns that curve backward. The springbok is characterised by a white face, a dark stripe running from the eyes to the mouth,
View Wikipedia Record: Antidorcas marsupialis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
19
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.41
EDGE Score: 2

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  82.123 lbs (37.25 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  9.171 lbs (4.16 kg)
Female Weight [1]  73.855 lbs (33.50 kg)
Male Weight [1]  90.39 lbs (41.00 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  22.4 %
Diet [3]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [3]  100 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  7 months 3 days
Male Maturity [2]  1 year 1 month
Gestation [2]  5 months 18 days
Litter Size [2]  1
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  20 years
Snout to Vent Length [1]  4.034 feet (123 cm)
Speed [4]  55.275 MPH (24.71 m/s)
Weaning [2]  4 months 1 day

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Succulent Karoo Namibia, South Africa No

Emblem of

South Africa

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5Antidorcas marsupialis, James W. Cain III, Paul R. Krausman, and Heather L. Germaine, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 753, pp. 1–7 (2004)
6The Namib: Detritus and Fog Dependence Scott Christy March 1st, 2006
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Canis mesomelas, Lyle R. Walton and Damien O. Joly, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 715, pp. 1–9 (2003)
9Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0