Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Giraffidae > Giraffa > Giraffa camelopardalis

Giraffa camelopardalis (giraffe)

Synonyms: Cervus camelopardalis (homotypic)

Wikipedia Abstract

The northern giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a species of giraffe, and is considered the type species of the genus. Whilst three other giraffe species were once considered subspecies of the conglomerate Giraffa camelopardalis species, recent studies have identified the northern giraffe as one of the four separate species of a reorganised Giraffa genus.[1][2] This species is composed of three subspecies: the Nubian giraffe (G. c. camelopardalis), Kordofan giraffe (G.c antiquorom) and West African giraffe (G.c. peralta). Around 4,550 individuals from all subspecies are currently present in the wild.
View Wikipedia Record: Giraffa camelopardalis

Infraspecies

Endangered Species

Status: Vulnerable
View IUCN Record: Giraffa camelopardalis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
8
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
32
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 16.54
EDGE Score: 2.86

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1,763.707 lbs (800.00 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  128.971 lbs (58.50 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  3 years 6 months
Male Maturity [1]  4 years 6 months
Gestation [1]  1 year 3 months
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  40 years
Snout to Vent Length [4]  14.596 feet (445 cm)
Speed [5]  32.01 MPH (14.31 m/s)
Weaning [1]  5 months 2 days
Height [3]  18 feet (5.5 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa Kenya, Mozambique, Somalia, Tanzania No
Eastern Afromontane Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe No
Horn of Africa Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Oman, Somalia, Yemen No
Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland No
Mediterranean Basin Algeria, Egypt, France, Greece, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Portugal, Spain, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey No

Emblem of

Tanzania, United Republic Of

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Aepyceros melampus (impala)2
Antidorcas marsupialis (springbok)1
Corythaixoides personatus leopoldi (Ugogo black-faced go-away bird)1
Diceros bicornis (black rhinoceros)1
Neotragus moschatus (suni)1

Predators

Panthera leo (Lion)[9]

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Giraffa camelopardalis, Anne Innis Dagg, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 5, pp. 1-8 (1971)
4Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
5Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
6Sex differences in giraffe feeding ecology: energetic and social constraints, Truman P. Young & Lynne A. Isbell, Ethology 87, 79-89 (1991)
7A RECORD OF FRUITS AND SEEDS DISPERSED BY MAMMALS AND BIRDS FROM SINGIDA DISTRICT OF TANGANYIKA TERRITORY, B. D. BURTT, Journal of Ecology Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 351-355 (1929)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Who's Eating Who
10Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0