Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Artiodactyla > Bovidae > Aepyceros > Aepyceros melampus

Aepyceros melampus (impala)

Synonyms: Antilope melampus (homotypic)

Wikipedia Abstract

("Aepyceros" redirects here. For the extinct species, see Aepyceros datoadeni. For other uses, see Impala (disambiguation).) The impala (pronounced /ɪmˈpɑːlə,-ˈpalə/) (Aepyceros melampus) is a medium-sized antelope in eastern and southern Africa. The sole member of the genus Aepyceros, it was first described by German zoologist Martin Hinrich Carl Lichtenstein in 1812. Two subspecies are recognised – the common impala, and the larger and darker black-faced impala. The impala reaches 70–92 centimetres (28–36 inches) at the shoulder and weighs 40–76 kilograms (88–168 pounds). It features a glossy, reddish brown coat. The male's slender, lyre-shaped horns are 45–92 centimetres (18–36 in) long.
View Wikipedia Record: Aepyceros melampus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.87
EDGE Score: 2.29

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  115.743 lbs (52.50 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  12.236 lbs (5.55 kg)
Male Weight [3]  137.79 lbs (62.50 kg)
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Ground [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 3 months
Male Maturity [1]  1 year 1 month
Gestation [1]  6 months 18 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  26 years
Snout to Vent Length [3]  4.789 feet (146 cm)
Speed [4]  47.199 MPH (21.1 m/s)
Weaning [1]  5 months 17 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland No

Emblem of

Lebanon

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Acinonyx jubatus (Cheetah)[6]
Canis mesomelas (Black-backed Jackal)[8]
Lycaon pictus (African wild dog)[6]
Panthera leo (Lion)[6]
Panthera pardus (Leopard)[6]

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4Wikipedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
5A RECORD OF FRUITS AND SEEDS DISPERSED BY MAMMALS AND BIRDS FROM SINGIDA DISTRICT OF TANGANYIKA TERRITORY, B. D. BURTT, Journal of Ecology Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 351-355 (1929)
6Who's Eating Who
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Canis mesomelas, Lyle R. Walton and Damien O. Joly, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 715, pp. 1–9 (2003)
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
10Nunn, C. L., and S. Altizer. 2005. The Global Mammal Parasite Database: An Online Resource for Infectious Disease Records in Wild Primates. Evolutionary Anthroplogy 14:1-2.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0