Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Scorpaeniformes > Cottidae > Cottus > Cottus cognatus

Cottus cognatus (Anadyr sculpin; Bear Lake bullhead; Cockatouch; Common slimy muddler; Miller's thumb; Northern sculpin; Slimy muddler; Slimy sculpin; Stargazer; Western slimy sculpin)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The slimy sculpin, Cottus cognatus, is a freshwater species of fish belonging to the family Cottidae, which is the largest sculpin family. They usually inhabit cold rocky streams or lakes across North America, ranging from the Great Lakes, southeast Minnesota, northeast Iowa, southwest Wisconsin and northeast Canada. Slimy sculpins have also been found roaming the cold streams of eastern Siberia.They are commonly confused with their closely related relatives, Mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi), and with tubenose gobys who are both freshwater fishes as well. The slimy sculpin is a nocturnal fish that usually spends most of its time on the stream bottom and seeks shelter under rocks and logs, especially during spawning season. When it swims, it sometimes appears to be “hopping” along the bottom
View Wikipedia Record: Cottus cognatus

Infraspecies

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  4.724 inches (12 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In a nest
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Speleophils (rock cavity)
Brood Guarder [1]  Yes
Litter Size [1]  1,420
Maximum Longevity [1]  7 years
Diet [2]  Omnivore
Female Maturity [1]  3 years

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
4Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0