Animalia > Chordata > Mammalia > Diprotodontia > Phascolarctidae > Phascolarctos > Phascolarctos cinereus

Phascolarctos cinereus (Koala)

Synonyms: Lipurus cinereus (homotypic)

Wikipedia Abstract

The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, or, inaccurately, koala bear) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland's eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Pelage colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possi
View Wikipedia Record: Phascolarctos cinereus

Infraspecies

Endangered Species

Status: Vulnerable
View IUCN Record: Phascolarctos cinereus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
21
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
46
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 41.29
EDGE Score: 3.74

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  20.503 lbs (9.30 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  0.36 grams
Diet [2]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [2]  100 %
Forages - Arboreal [2]  100 %
Female Maturity [1]  1 year 9 months
Male Maturity [1]  3 years
Gestation [1]  31 days
Litter Size [1]  1
Litters / Year [1]  1
Maximum Longevity [1]  22 years
Nocturnal [2]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [3]  33 inches (85 cm)
Weaning [1]  11 months 12 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Queensland

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Range Map

External References

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
4KOALA FEEDING AND ROOSTING TREES IN THE CAMPBELLTOWN AREA OF NEW SOUTH WALES, ALAN F. SLUITER , ROBERT L. CLOSE AND STEVEN J. WARD, Australian Mammalogy 23: 173-175 (2005)
5Low-density koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations in the mulgalands of south-west Queensland. II. Distribution and diet, B. J. Sullivan, W. M. Norris and G. S. Baxter, Wildlife Research, 2003, 30, 331–338
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Species taxanomy provided by GBIF Secretariat (2019). GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. Checklist dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/39omei accessed via GBIF.org on 2020-03-21; License: CC BY 4.0